Autism Genetics Network: Increasing representation of human diversity

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a common, often devastating neuropsychiatric condition with largely unknown pathophysiology. Although ASD has a multifactorial etiology, it encompasses a large genetic component. The investigators in this proposal aim to continue and enhance our collaborative effort that has produced significant advances in our understanding of ASD over the last four years and generated highly successful, open data and biomaterials resources for the research community, the NIMH Genetics Initiative and the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE).

 

Our Network involves six research sites and the AGRE DCC, collaborating in a systematic, comprehensive investigation of ASD genetics in order to identify rare mutations, chromosomal abnormalities, and common variation contributing to ASD susceptibility in the AA population. Specifically, we will enrich existing resources by recruiting at least 600 AA probands and additional family members. Our recruitment plan includes an embedded health disparities project that will evaluate access to care for AAs with ASD and clarify factors influencing participation of AA individuals in genetic research. We will employ novel methods to define the ancestral origin of specific chromosomal segments and ascertain the background on which susceptibility alleles occur. We will perform follow up GWA on ASD-related endophenotypes or co-variates, such as language delay, sex and head circumference. In parallel, we will conduct whole exome sequencing (WES) and analysis of copy number variation (CNV) using 2.5M SNP arrays yielding high resolution molecular karyotypes and providing a resource on genome-wide CNV and coding sequence variation (SNV) in ASD.

Gene expression profiling and network analysis will be used to prioritize variants. Genetic risk factors identified in the mostly European samples will be tested for association in the AA sample to determine whether these cohorts share the same genetic risk factors, using a sample size providing power to replicate previous associations and to identify rare, recurrent CNV and SNV. The observation of new forms or different population frequencies of ASD-related variation in this sample as well as the sharing of most CNV and SNV with other cohorts are both outcomes that will have great significance for future studies and clinical care. As has been our practice, our Network will make all phenotypic and genotype data accessible via the internet on a rolling basis, further enhancing the value of this resource to the community.

For more information, contact Tracie Ebalu at tracie.ebalu@einstein.yu.edu.

You can fill out our secure online enrollment form to see if your child may be eligible by clicking on this link.

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